E-cigarettes far more carcinogenic than tobacco

Electronic_Cigarette_SmokingE-cigarettes were introduced as a substitute to tobacco-based cigarettes for people who are unable to leave the habit of smoking nicotine.  The new cigarettes have been marketed extensively by manufacturing companies citing health hazards to tobacco, particularly its cancer causing capacity.

A latest study by Japanese scientists has found that electronic cigarettes contain up to 10 times more cancer-causing substances than regular tobacco.

The researchers comprised a team of experts from Japanese Health Ministry. They examined the vapour, finding carcinogens like formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The former was found in quantities exceeding traditional cigarettes by 10 times. The content of formaldehyde increases manifold particularly when the wire (which vaporizes the liquid) gets overheated, leading to production of higher amounts of harmful carcinogenic substances.

The findings of the study are particularly serious because some manufacturers are selling such products for dual use (with tobacco) or as a gateway for young people looking forward to start smoking. E-cigarettes are largely represented as a safe way of smoking, not harmful to one’s health.

The report has been submitted at the National Institute of Public Health. Japan’s Health Ministry is reported to be examining the results to develop ways to regulate e-cigarettes.

E-cigarettes work by heating flavored liquid, which often contains nicotine, and creating a vapor. As part of their study, the researchers analyzed several kinds of e-cigarette fluid, using a special ‘puffing’ machine that inhaled 10 of 15 puffs of vapour.

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